Euromillions winner statistics

Euromillions winners: top 10 biggest jackpots won

How to Beat the Odds of the EuroMillions Game

Of course, you cannot beat the odds of EuroMillions.  But thankfully, math can help. There’s a way to increase your chances of winning the game.

The only way to increase your chances of winning is to buy more tickets.

But buying more tickets is useless if you’re making the wrong choices.  It’s not OK to choose 1-2-3-4-5, and 2-3-4-5-6, and 46-47-48-49-50.

I will explain why.

But first of all, I must ask you to forget about hot or cold numbers. For the longest time, people mistakenly believe that if a number frequently occurs in the past, the same number is bound to be drawn more often in the future.  This belief must be corrected.

Now, let’s proceed.

All combinations in EuroMillions 5/50 have the same probability.

It means that 1-2-3-4-5 is equally likely.

Play 2-4-6-8-10, and that is equally likely too.

Perhaps your combination is 5-10-15-20-25, this combination has the same probability as any other in the universe of Euromillions’ possible combinations.

The truth, all combinations have equal chances.

But think about this.  Consider more tickets where all numbers are picked in the form of straight combinations:

  • 1-2-3-4-5
  • 2-3-4-5-6
  • 3-4-5-6-7
  • 46-47-48-49-50

If I ask lotto players to spend their money on the above combinations, the surest response I will get is “no way.”

And why not?

That’s because people don’t trust their understanding of probability.

“Gut feeling” dominates the logic

You see, if you are confident that all combinations have the same probability, why be afraid to play all those combinations.

In other words, while you believe that all combinations have the same probability, there’s part of you that says buying “multiple tickets where all combinations are straight numbers” cannot be right.

But gut feeling shouldn’t be superior to mathematics.

If you want to win the EuroMillions game, you have to have a strong mathematical foundation.

And mathematics says:

There’s a big difference between having lots of wrong combinations and having the right combinations.

But how do we explain this mathematically?

Prize Information

How do you win prizes?

You win prizes by matching the numbers you select to the winning numbers drawn. There are 13 different prize tiers, and you can win prizes just by matching two main numbers. To win the jackpot, you must match all five main numbers and both Lucky Stars.

Does the jackpot roll over if there’s no winner?

The jackpot starts at a minimum of €17 million (approximately £15 million) and rolls over if there is not a winner. However, the jackpot can only go up to a maximum of €200 million. Once it reaches that level, it is capped and can only stay at €200 million for four draws at the most. In the next draw (the fifth one at €200 million), the jackpot must be won and the money will be shared between players in the highest winning tier if there are no Match 5 + 2 winners.

How much of the money from ticket sales goes towards prizes?

Fifty percent of the money you spend on a ticket is returned to players as prize money. A percentage of this prize fund is then allocated to each of the 13 prize categories. This is known as a pari-mutuel prize structure, so the prizes are not fixed and vary from draw to draw depending on how many tickets are sold and the number of winners.

The money that is not given to the prize fund is distributed in a number of different ways – with 28 percent going to good causes, 12 percent to the UK Government as Lottery Duty and five percent to retailers as commission. The remaining five percent covers operating costs and profit for the lottery operator.

How do you claim prizes?

The method for claiming prizes depends on how you play and how much you win. If you play online, smaller amounts will be transferred straight into your lottery account, but you must contact the National Lottery for anything larger than £30,000. If you buy a paper ticket, you must visit an authorised retailer for awards up to £100. You can go to a National Lottery Post Office or claim by mail if you win up to £50,000, but you must claim larger amounts in person. Take a look at the page on Claiming EuroMillions Prizes for more details.

What happens to prize money before it’s claimed?

When a prize is waiting to be claimed, it is held in trust managed by Law Debenture rather than a Camelot bank account. Any interest that accrues during this time is transferred to the Good Causes Fund – but is first used to pay various fees. These include Law Debenture’s trustee fees and fees owed to external auditors, along with bank charges and tax.

Taxes in Other EuroMillions Countries

If you win a EuroMillions prize in Austria, Belgium, France, Ireland or Luxembourg, you will not be taxed on your winnings, just like in the UK. However, winners will be taxed in Portugal, Spain and Switzerland.

In Portugal, any prize worth more €5,000 is taxed at a rate of 20 percent, while there is a levy of 35 percent in Switzerland on any winnings over CHF1 million. Spanish prizes of more than €40,000 are subject to tax at 20 percent.

You can only claim a EuroMillions prize in the country where you bought your ticket, so you will have to accept the local rules on tax even if you are not a resident of the country.

Why Prizes Differ Between Currencies

The Euro is the base currency for EuroMillions as it is used by seven of the nine participating countries. When a jackpot is won in the UK the equivalent figure in pounds is paid out, based on the exchange rate on the day of the draw.

For non-jackpot prizes, the amount you receive in the UK is not worked out purely on the basis of the exchange rate. Instead, a formula is in place to take into account each country’s contribution to the game.

Each country that participates in EuroMillions contributes €1.10 into the Common Prize Fund, which is used to pay out prizes to all winners. Camelot’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund is the 50% of £1.74 from every EuroMillions ticket sold.

If, using the exchange rates on the day of a draw, Camelot’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund works out at less than €1.10, prizes paid out to UK players will be reduced to compensate for the shortfall. If, on the other hand, Camelot’s contribution amounts to more than €1.10, UK winners will receive comparatively bigger prizes than winners in other countries.

To put it simply, if £1.74 is worth less than €2.20, UK winners will receive smaller prizes than those in other countries. If £1.74 is worth more than €2.20, UK players will receive more. These rules ensure that prizes are always in line with how much each participating country contributes to the Common Prize Fund.

EuroMillions Taxes vs Other Lotteries

EuroMillions offers some of the largest jackpots in the world, and the fact that prizes are not taxed in six of the nine countries makes it stand out even more in comparison with some of the other big lotteries.

American games such as Powerball and Mega Millions, for example, have tax obligations at both a state and federal level, so although these games regularly offer the biggest jackpots out of any lottery in the world, the payouts can end up significantly lower than the pre-draw estimate.

New Yorkers suffer heavier taxes than anyone else in the U.S. In August 2018, one player from the state won a Powerball jackpot advertised at $245.6 million, but they ended up walking away with a significantly lower sum. They opted to take a cash lump sum of $147 million, which worked out as a final payout of $99.4 million – around 40% of the advertised jackpot – after taxes had been deducted.

In EuroMillions, you will be given the specified amount with no deductions if you play in a country which does not tax winnings, such as the UK. The UK player who anonymously claimed £121 million in April 2018, for example, received a much larger payout than the $245 million Powerball winner, even though at first glance it would seem they had not won as much.

Total Winners to Date

The total number of EuroMillions winners across all thirteen prize tiers is shown below. This is updated shortly after the latest draw has taken place.

Number of players that have won a EuroMillions prize since 13th February 2004:

2,000,000,000

To view a comprehensive breakdown of winners from all countries, visit the Winner Statistics page.

Biggest Jackpot Winners from the UK

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Tuesday 8th October 2019 £170,221,000 Anonymous
Tuesday 12th July 2011 £161,653,000 Colin and Chris Weir, Largs, Scotland
Friday 10th August 2012 £148,656,000 Adrian and Gillian Bayford, Haverhill, Suffolk
Tuesday 11th June 2019 £123,458,008 Anonymous
Tuesday 24th April 2018 £121,328,187 Anonymous
Tuesday 1st January 2019 £114,969,775 Patrick and Frances Connolly, Moira, Northern Ireland

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Austria

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Friday 16th May 2008 €55,609,411 Anonymous, Carinthia
Tuesday 19th August 2014 €54,304,297 Anonymous, Tirol
Friday 6th March 2009 €50,000,000 Anonymous, Styria
Friday 5th March 2010 €46,258,004 Anonymous, Burgenland
Tuesday 8th May 2018 €45,566,998 Anonymous, Tirol

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Belgium

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Tuesday 11th October 2016 €168,085,323 Anonymous, Schaerbeek
Tuesday 2nd June 2017 €153,873,716 Anonymous, Flemish Region
Tuesday 21st August 2018 €107,839,228 Anonymous, Flemish Region
Friday 9th February 2007 €100,000,000 Anonymous, Tirlemont
Tuesday 25th June 2013 €93,968,807 Anonymous

Biggest Jackpot Winners from France

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Tuesday 13th November 2012 €169,837,010 Anonymous, Alpes-Maritime
Tuesday 13th September 2011 €162,256,622 Anonymous, Calvados
Tuesday 1st September 2020 €157,170,843 Anonymous, Bas-Rhin
Friday 29th March 2013 €132,486,744 Anonymous, Seine-et-Marne
Friday 21st December 2012 €101,835,641 Anonymous, Haute-Garonne

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Ireland

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Tuesday 19th February 2019 €175,475,380 Anonymous, Co Dublin
Friday 29th July 2005 €115,436,126 Dolores McNamara, Co Limerick
Tuesday 25th June 2013 €93,968,807 Anonymous, Co Dublin
Tuesday 24th January 2017 €88,587,275 Anonymous, Co Dublin
Friday 19th September 2014 €86,732,923 Anonymous, Co Dublin

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Luxembourg

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Friday 27th September 2013 €65,793,284 Anonymous
Friday 9th January 2015 €31,666,941 Anonymous
Friday 24th January 2020 €28,601,720

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Portugal

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Friday 24th October 2014 €190,000,000 Anonymous, Castelo Branco
Friday 20th November 2015 €163,553,041 Anonymous, Eiras
Friday 17th January 2020 €100,779,289 Anonymous, Mafra
Friday 6th March 2015 €100,000,000 Anonymous
Tuesday 14th March 2017 €80,571,199 Anonymous, Faro

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Spain

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Friday 6th October 2017 €190,000,000 Anonymous, Las Palmas, Gran Canaria
Tuesday 7th July 2020 €144,542,315 Anonymous, Mayorga, Valladolid
Friday 13th June 2014 €137,313,501 Anonymous, Parla, Madrid
Friday 7th February 2020 €130,000,000 Anonymous, Madrid
Friday 25th September 2020 €130,000,000 Anonymous, Valladolid

Biggest Jackpot Winners from Switzerland

Draw Date Jackpot Won Winner(s)
Tuesday 2nd October 2018 €162,403,002 | CHF 183,897,039.30 Anonymous, North-West Switzerland
Tuesday 19th December 2017 €135,346,147 | 157,096,272.80 Anonymous, Zurich
Friday 23rd August 2013 €93,948,087 | CHF 115,507,763.80 Anonymous, Valais
Friday 6th April 2018 €76,119,641 | CHF 89,415,763.15 Anonymous
Tuesday 11th November 2011 €67,939,183 | CHF 83,979,625.35 Anonymous

FAQs

Some of the most frequently asked questions and answers regarding EuroMillions Plus are shown below. If you have any further questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Q: Does the Match 5 top prize roll over if there are no winners?
A: No, all prizes amounts are fixed and cannot roll over.

Q: Where are the Plus numbers on my EuroMillions ticket?
A: The five main numbers you enter in the main EuroMillions draw are also used as your EuroMillions Plus numbers. Your ticket will have ‘PLUS YES’ printed on to confirm that your numbers have been entered into both draws.

Q: When do ticket sales close?
A: If you are playing online, entries close at 7:25pm every Tuesday and Friday. If you’re playing instore, it’s 7:30pm.

Q: Are the Plus results the same as the EuroMillions results?
A: No, EuroMillions Plus is a separate draw to EuroMillions and therefore has different winning numbers — however your chosen EuroMillions numbers are entered into both games when Plus is played.

Questions or Comments About EuroMillions

Please, I invite you to join the conversation. If you have questions about the EuroMillions game, please let me know.  If you have comments about this article, then leave your comment below. Thank you for reading

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About UK Millionaire Maker

The EuroMillions UK Millionaire Maker guarantees that at least one player in the UK will win £1 million in every EuroMillions draw. As the two games are played separately, it is possible to win a prize in both the main EuroMillions game and Millionaire Maker, so players are advised to check their tickets carefully.

How it Works

The odds of winning the UK Millionaire Maker game vary depending on the number of players in each game. For example, a Tuesday EuroMillions draw tends to attract fewer players, meaning your odds of winning in midweek are better than on a Friday.

Millionaire Maker codes can start with the letter H, J, M, T, V, X or Z , and the chances of winning are exactly the same for each code. Visit the How it Works page for a more detailed explanation about how the Millionaire Maker codes are selected and how the odds vary from draw to draw.

European Millionaire Maker works in a similar way, but is open to everyone who plays a line in any of the nine participating EuroMillions nations, and the first letter of the code will be different in each country.

How to Claim

If you have won a UK Millionaire Maker prize, then you need to claim within 180 days of the draw date, as per the UK EuroMillions Rules. If you do not claim in time, your prize, and the interest that has accumulated, will be allocated to the lottery’s Good Causes fund.

View the How to Claim page for more information.

History of the UK Millionaire Maker

12th January 2019 – To increase the amount of Millionaire Maker special event draws that are held, the number of codes in every standard draw decreased from two to one. The first special event draw is scheduled for spring 2019, when 40 UK millionaires will be created in one night.

24th September 2016 – The number of Millionaire Maker prizes on offer in a standard draw doubled to two. Mega Friday became Mega Week, providing even more exciting prizes and luxury experiences.

31st October 2014 – Millionaire Raffle became Millionaire Maker and the first Mega Friday draw was held, rewarding 25 players with £1 million and a VIP trip to Makepeace Island in Australia.

March 2014 – The National Lottery applied for permission to rename Millionaire Raffle as Millionaire Maker and provide non-cash prizes alongside the £1 million award in select draws.

26th July 2013 – The 100 UK Millionaires Raffle returned to give another 100 ticket holders the chance to become millionaires. This highly anticipated draw resulted in a huge increase in ticket sales but, in the event, left the previous record unchallenged when only 92 of the 100 £1 million prizes were claimed.

31st May 2013 – The £1 Million Every Month for a Year draw was held. Instead of the prize being worth £1 million, this draw offered one lucky player a prize of £12 million, paid in twelve £1 million monthly instalments.

27th July 2012 – The promotional 100 Millionaires draw on the night of the opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games in London resulted in 97 of the 100 Millionaire Maker winners claiming their prize, breaking the world record for the most millionaires made in one night.

25th November 2011 – Millionaires Month began, awarding 50 £1 million prizes in the four weeks leading up to Christmas.

13th November 2009 – Millionaire Raffle was launched.

Christmas and New Year’s Special Draws

There are often special versions of the UK Millionaire Maker game held around the festive season which give away multiple raffle prizes. In the past, these games have been held on Christmas Day/Boxing Day and New Year’s Eve/New Year’s Day.

To read more about special festive draws, visit the Christmas and New Year’s EuroMillions pages for more information and to find out about upcoming events this year.

100 Millionaires

Occasionally, the UK Millionaire Maker will hold special editions of the game which will see 100 players win £1 million. Currently, the 100 UK Millionaire Raffle draw which took place on Friday 27th July 2012 holds the world record for making the highest number of lottery millionaires in one night after 97 of the 100 prizes were claimed.

Players receive one free entry into the UK Millionaire Maker for each line of EuroMillions numbers purchased and this remains the case regardless of how many Millionaire Maker prizes are on offer.

The Low-High Patterns Based On The Actual EuroMillions Results

Here’s another probability study using the low-high pattern.

We derive the low-high patterns using the following sets:

Low = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,…,25}

High = {26,27,28,29,30,…,50}

Again, the results of the study show that EuroMillions follows the dictate of probability.

The table and the graph above reinforces the fact that the EuroMillions game is subordinate to the principle of probability.

  • 3-low-2-high is expected to appear 416 times – it occurred 468 times in the real draw.
  • 4-low-1-high is projected to appear 190 times – it appeared in 216 times in the actual draw.
  • 0-low-5-high is supposed to be drawn 32 times – it was drawn 22 times in the real draw.

As a EuroMillions player, you should pay attention to the composition of your combination and make sure that it follows either the 3-low-2-high or 2-low-3-high patterns.  And never play the rest of the low-high patterns.

UK Tax Implications

While there is no tax on lottery winnings in the UK, there are a number of important considerations to keep in mind if you are lucky enough to bank a substantial amount such as a EuroMillions jackpot.

Inheritance Tax

Inheritance tax (IHT) is paid when a UK resident dies and their estate is worth more than £325,000. Everything above that threshold will be taxed at 40 percent. If you win a large EuroMillions prize and your estate exceeds the £325,000 valuation, you should be aware of the rules regarding IHT and how it will affect your heirs.

It is very common for big winners to want to share their jackpot in some way, but if you want to make a gift without paying tax you must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Give the gift more than seven years before you die.
  • Give the gift to your husband, wife, or civil partner.
  • Give less than your annual allowance of £3,000.

The seven-year rule is in place to stop people from giving money away just before they die so that they can avoid IHT. As long as you live for at least seven years after making your gift, you can give as much as you want to whoever you want without it being liable for IHT.

If you were to die within seven years, the recipient would have to pay IHT based on a sliding scale. The rate of tax is the full 40% if there are less than three years between you giving your gift and dying, and then it goes down to 32% in years three to four, 24% in years four to five, 16% in years five to six and 8% if there are between six and seven years between your gift and your death.

Any gifts made to your spouse or civil partner are exempt from IHT, so it would not matter if you died within seven years. You can also give gifts to any registered charity without being liable for tax, along with some national organisations, such as the National Trust, universities or museums.

You can also take advantage of the £3,000 ‘gift allowance’ each year without incurring IHT. If you give away more than this amount and pass away within seven years, the recipient would have to pay tax. It is possible to carry over your leftover allowance from one tax year to the next, but only up to a maximum of £6,000.

Other Tax-free Gifts

You can also give smaller gifts of up to £250 to as many people as you want without them being subject to IHT, although this would not include anyone who has already received gifts totalling the whole £3,000 annual exemption.

Wedding gifts can also be exempt from IHT, but only if they are made before the wedding and there has to be proof that the marriage does go ahead. You can make wedding gifts of up to £5,000 to a child, £2,500 to a grandchild or great-grandchild or £1,000 to anyone else. You can also make gifts to help pay the living costs of an ex-spouse, an elderly dependent or a child.

Syndicates

Lottery rules in the UK stipulate that only one person can be paid a prize, so when playing in a syndicate it is essential to have a formal agreement in place to show to tax authorities. This will prove the money was not just a gift and that everyone is entitled to their share. Anyone playing in an informal syndicate should be aware that they may have to pay inheritance tax on the full amount if the syndicate leader dies within seven years of the prize money being shared.

Tax on Interest

Most people can earn some interest from their savings without paying tax, but this might not be the case if you win a large enough EuroMillions prize. While there is no tax on the initial sum paid into your account, it may be that the win starts to produce an income through interest. This will then be taxed as part of your normal income tax.

How to Play

How do you play EuroMillions?

To play EuroMillions, you must select five main numbers from 1 to 50 and two Lucky Star numbers between 1 and 12. You can buy tickets from authorised retailers in any of the nine participating countries, or enter online. View the How to Play EuroMillions page for a step-by-step guide to taking part.

What is the cut-off time for ticket sales?

Ticket sales close at 7:30pm UK time on the night of a draw. Sales remain closed until the draw has taken place, reopening shortly after for the next draw.

Can you enter more than one draw in advance?

You can buy tickets for up to four weeks in advance, entering either the Tuesday draw each week, the Friday draw, or both. It is therefore possible to enter your numbers into eight consecutive draws by playing every Tuesday and Friday for four weeks. You can also sign up to play continuously by direct debit.

Can the same number appear as a main number and a Lucky Star?

Yes, the Lucky Stars are drawn from a separate pool of 12 numbers. You can therefore select the same number(s) as a Lucky Star and a main ball.

How much does it cost to play?

The cost of a single EuroMillions play in the UK is £2.50. This price also enters you automatically into the Millionaire Maker.

Can you play EuroMillions if you don’t live in a participating country?

EuroMillions tickets are available from retailers in Austria, Belgium, France, Ireland, Luxembourg, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland, as well as the UK. However, the game can also be played online in other countries thanks to online concierge and betting services. Go to the Tickets page to take part.

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